Study: Nearly a Third of All American Cancer Deaths Are Linked to Smoking

Study: Nearly a Third of All American Cancer Deaths Are Linked to Smoking

Study: Nearly a Third of All American Cancer Deaths Are Linked to Smoking

There are still 40 million smokers in the U.S., according to researchers from the American Cancer Society. This comes despite the fact that a third of all cancer deaths in the U.S. can be linked back to smoking, according to a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

A third of all cancer deaths in men, and a quarter in women can be linked to cigarette smoking, according to the study. This amounts to 167,000 cancer deaths in the U.S. in 2014 (the year of the study) that can be linked to cigarette smoking.

The study examined cancer deaths state by state. The 10 states with the highest rates of smoking linked back to cancer are in the south, while the lowest rates are in the north or the west.

Research found that the cigarette linked cancer death rate was highest among black men at 35 percent. Among white men it was 30 percent, and 27 percent among Hispanics.

Among women, the highest rate was whites at 21 percent, black women at 19 percent, and 12 percent for Hispanics. The study found widespread shortcomings among the states’ efforts to reduce smoking. CBS, the Los Angeles Times, the AP, and TIME all reported on the study.

Steven J. Lipsky MD, FACEP has been a Board Certified Emergency Physician in Arizona for the last 37 years, and a resident of the Town of Paradise Valley for the last 36 years. Steve Lipsky on Google Plus